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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
medicare and do not want it to be cut. and wonks in washington, d.c. spend their time trying to figure out how to cut medicare. both democrat and republican. and with this very thorny contradiction in mind, politicians and think tank analysts and the like have developed a whole secondary-coated language to talk about medicare. so premium support instead of privatizing medicare, and structural medicare reform instead of raising the eligibility age. now, remember the context for all this. this is important. remember that phrase we first started hearing at the start of the health reform debate, which may be apocryphal, "keep government hands off my medicare." the big tea party uprising was in large part a reaction to the idea, quote/unquote, of socialized medicine. it was the affordable care act, and the government, quote, takeover of health care, that fanned the flames of the post-obama tea party protest. but, of course, most of the actual republicans who were actually elected back then were elected because they ran ads like this. >> congressman brad ellsworth said he would protect our senio
't want taxes to go up. but we only run the house, democrats continue to run washington. >> gregg: national correspondent steve centanni joins us live from washington. >> reporter: d.c. may be some shutting down for christmas but the clock hasn't stopped and fiscal cliff is closer than ever. no deal was reached this week to keep taxes from going up. joan boehner pulled plug on the plan "b" and he says it is now up to the president and g.o.p. is continuing to hammer away at president obama. >> this is the year size of our debt surpassed the our economy. a grim milestone if we don't come to grips to w it. the president's plan to raise tax rates ko could still be as far as eye could see. >> reporter: president obama will return after christmas and work on fiscal issues. he believes a comprehensive deal could be reached but he seems to be acknowledging for scaled back plan for cutting taxes on the middle-class. >> even though democrats and republicans are arguing about whether those rates should go up for the wealthiest individuals, all of us, every single one of us agree that tax rat
journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to support jobs in the economy.en >> noen question, jason. taxes are going up. we know that. spending going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. >> right. >> not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> what happened was the supre
an update on the hurricane sandy relief bill making its way through congress. "washington journal" is next. >> nobody will get 100% of what they want. let's make sure middle-class families and the american economy and the world economy are not adversely impacted because people cannot do their jobs. host: the headline in this morning's "washington post" -- president obama and senate leaders were on the verge of an agreement that would let taxes rise on the wealthiest households while protecting the vast majority of americans from tax hikes set to hit in january. welcome to the saturday edition of "and the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes of the program we are going to be talking about senate negotiating a fiscal clifts deal, what has been going on on that half of the capital. see what they are talking about and how things are going. we want to get your input and your part of the conversation. you can reach out to us on twitter. facebook, and you can send us an e-mail. this is more from the article, the lead story in "the washington post." they ride, the deve
how some states are bucking the washington trend next. thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. next, we get priory boarding on our flight i booked with miles. all because of the card. and me. okay, what's the plan? plan? mm-hmm. we're on vacation. there is no plan. really? [ male announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with speci perks on united. get it and you're in. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you'v
in the reason was because declining enthusiasm. so there's not a republican in washington who describe themselves as a moderate or liberal, but the third of republicans in the country do. >> just to allays this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but that hasn't gotten as much attention in season mention that i like the bromides we should ignore chapter, which i would reach of the political system will collect no, no. third party to the, no. budget amendment say no. term limits they say no and public financing of elections no. but then i have a whole bunch of things they say yes to and i propose we have an election between the shadow congress and the current congress and then we can see who wins. so let me invite everybody to do closing comments. >> just going down a couple of these. does this represent the republican party as a whole. as citizens just said no, but i
relief with just two pills. ♪ >> well, washington may have made a big left turn this year, but in states across the country, another kind of reform is in the air. we begin in michigan which this month became the nation's 24th right to work state. we're back with jason riley and kim strassel and wall street journal senior economics writer steve moore also joins the panel. so, steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets enough attention. >> i agree. >> paul: the reforms taking place across the country in a lot of states. who are the stars you're looking at? >> i entirely agreement with your premise, paul. if you look at, talk about the demise of the republicans on the national levels we're not seeing that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> s
associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he is responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students to seek positions in the nonprofit and government sectors, and assisting students to find ways to fund legal education to make it possible for them to pursue careers outside of traditional law firms. most of his career, deena morrison work for the public citizen litigation group, which she cofounded with ralph nader in 1972, and directed for over 25 years. his work included open government, opening up the legal profession, suing agencies that failed to apply comply with the law, protecting the rights of consumers, and protecting unrepresented class members in class action settlements. he has argued 20 cases in the supreme court, including victories in the virginia state board of pharmacy, virginia citizens consumer council, making it subject to the first amendment. and striking out over 200 federal laws containing the legislativ
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
a year ago. construction began in september. >> thank you, jack. george washington was supposed to have said that the most important inauguration was not the first one but the second want to see if we could reaffirm or transfer powers. whether we are republicans or democrats come we are looking forward to this. >> can we have mr. kerry did say something? >> thank you, senator. i am grateful to be here on behalf of the presidential inaugural committee. the partnership we have formed has been terrific and is integral to making sure that the events that we do here and throughout the capital this weekend is functioning in this great moment in our democracy. we are thrilled to have such great partners. they are waiting to help us execute with what the president and vice president want to see. we are grateful to have such strong partners. >> okay, ma'am? >> if you could let us know, this is paid for with housing and senate money, it will cost about 1,200,000 total, which is less than last year. we are coming in under budget, even though it will hold as many peeps best people. >> [inaudible qu
, not his washington office, we're told. but let's start with that, chris. how exactly does that happen? >> well, megyn, one supposes that the screening for interns willing to toil for some elected official is not that strict. but -- maybe they're not going to do a background check for sex offender. but, you know, immigration status, you'd think there might have been something that could have happened there that they would have done the standard employment verification, but maybe they didn't because he was just an intern. but, gosh, this is a state of affairs that new jersey republicans would really have liked to have known about in october instead of december. megyn: yeah. and i -- the business, the guy was 18 years old, we're told. so the business about the sex offender registry, i don't know, to me there's a question mark on that because if you get that while you're under age, which is what we're told is what happened with this guy, it may not be accessible via public record. but if he had to register -- so i don't know. i don't know what the story is there. however, on the illegal i
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and then i immediately became an editor of science and i was in the real world for two years. so, my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert it is best to accept the mainstream science. it should always come before politics. and that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. so, in view of a plea for teen science i don't country talk playing for the team right or blue but for science and i think we should always try to purge antiscientific thinking even if it comes from our friends and political allies
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
is agreeing to another bad inside-the-beltway washington deal. by the way, stealing from our children and our grandchildren -- that's immoral. which party now will stand up for them? for our kids? our grandkids? which party's going to stop the madness? joining me with reaction, florida senator marco rubio. you know, senator, i am a little frustrated here because this is our one check and balance -- and that case has not been made. what's wrong with making the case that they are the party against generational theft? i think that's a winning issue for any party that makes that case. >> thanks for having me on. it was a very powerful introduction. you are exactly right. here's the fundamental problem. i recognize the difficult position that the speaker's in now, if january,ing nothing happens, we go over the fiscal cliff. but i are right in the point we are making. this is the great flaw in all of these arguments that the president's making that i wish more people were talking about. if you raise taxes on the wealthiest americans, who he calls the wealthiest merv, people making $250,000 or more,
right now in washington, and i was cheered to see the president's opening bid, but the consensus in washington is that we have to come up with a grand bargain, dot dot dot we have to do something with entitlements. this is the big thing. something about entitlements. i just don't understand why that's the case. the reason i don't understand why that's the case is the big problem is the rate of growth of health care costs. i think we can all agree on that, right? >> yes. >> now medicare -- the rate of growth in medicare is significantly lower than the rate of growth of health care costs in the private sector. it's doing a better job of controlling cost relative to the private sector. then we just passed a huge bill that was incredibly contentious, which is called the affordable care act. the vast majority of the legislative language of which is about controlling costs in health care over the future. so it seems to me like the reasonable thing to do is to wait four years, five years, implement the bill and see if the cost control measures that have been put it in place, fought abou
if we're going to see that sense of brotherhood or sisterhood any time soon in washington. i'm still convinced they are not going to come to an agreement on the fiscal cliff unless compelled to do so by an adverse external event like a sharply lower equity market. lou: and is, you know, i can't imagine a market ever going down as john is suggesting here simply because a government chooses not to function. >> well, if it means we're headed into recession, the markets will react. in a typical bear market, stocks sell off by 20%. it's great to have a compromise before the year end, but time is running out. it's not possible. lou: how is it that a treasury secretary responsible for the integrity of the markets, the currency, responsible, indeed, for the financial system of this country, largely, broadly, and internationally, would sink to the level of a political operative making statements about we're going over the fiscal cliff and we're ready to go. >> the president put him in charge of the negotiations from his point of view. lou: clever. >> he's wearing two hats at this point in tim
in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both of our resources and of our innovative skills to help the country through these times and put us in a good footing for the next 50, 100 years. and secondly, i think this report really is the beginning of a process of creating an effective deep and stable bipartisan consensus on energy policy, in a town where everything is about the zero sum game. we are trying to escape that zero sum game. and we see the oil security as a unifyin
. and the more fair we are here in washington, you make more, you pay more. you make less you pay less. and i'm one of those that likes two deductions. one for charitable giving and the other for the mortgage interest dedux. we can negotiate over numbers. that's not a problem. we can compromise, we can reach an agreement, a compromise over numbers. but let's don't compromise on principle that is so basic, simply says, if you make more you pay more. it's an easy concept. you make more you pay more. you make less you pay less. that's fair. and for heaven's sake, let's do this and let's take that obamacare burden off the working poor in america that are going to get socked with that tax. and we were told for so long, if we don't do something, there will be 30 million, maybe 20 million, 30 million people in america who won't have insurance. and then we get to the bottom of it, we find out, well, now we're going to have lots of people pay lots more taxes and we're still -- oh, and we're gutting medicare in obamacare, we're gutting it $716 billion, so the seniors will have less health care. oh, i k
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)